LD FACTS

 

Below are some current facts about learning disabilities (LDs) in the United States and Canada

  • Reports of LD across the life span provide irrefutable evidence that the condition is lifelong and does not disappear upon leaving school. (The State of Learning Disabilities: Facts, Trends and Emerging Issues, 2014. LD.org)
  • Up to one-third of people attribute LD to casues that are inaccurate, including excessive time watching TV (22%), poor diet (31%), and childhood vaccinations (24%). (National Centre for Learning Disabilities, 2014)
  • Seven out of ten parents, educators and members of the general public incorrectly link learning disabilities with intellectual disability ("mental retardation") and autism. Half or more of school administrators do so as well. (Tremaine Foundation 2010: as published in The State of Learning Disabilities: Facts, Trends and Emerging Issues, 2014. LD.org)
  • One in three parents report deep feelings of isolation, stress, anxiety, guilt and pessimism regarding their child's learning and attention issues. (National Centre for Learning Disabilities, 2014)
  • More students with LD are found in households living in poverty than in children from the general population. (National Centre for Learning Disabilities, 2014)
  • One in two students with LD experiences a suspension or expulsion. (National Centre for Learning Disabilities, 2014)
  • One in two young adults with LD (55%) reported having some type of involvement with the criminal justice system within 8 years of leaving highschool. One in three have been arrested. (National Centre for Learning Disabilities, 2014 and LD.org)
  • Almost four in ten mistakenly asssociate learning disabilities with sensory impairments like blindness and deafness. (Tremaine Foundation 2010: as published in The State of Learning Disabilities: Facts, Trends and Emerging Issues, 2014. LD.org)
  • Approximately 51% of people think that what people call "learning disabilities" are the result of laziness. (Tremaine Foundation 2010: as published in The State of Learning Disabilities: Facts, Trends and Emerging Issues, 2014. LD.org)
  • Students who repeat two grades have an almost 100% chance of dropping out of school. The high rate of grade retention among students with disabilities may be directly related to the unacceptably high drop-out rate of this group.
  • (Tremaine Foundation 2010: as published in The State of Learning Disabilities: Facts, Trends and Emerging Issues, 2014. LD.org)
  • Parental expectations are important because research has found them to be associated with both levels of student achievement and general post-high school outcomes. Unfortunately, low parental expectations align more with current levels of postsecondary suceess than do the expectations that students with LD have for themselves. (Tremaine Foundation 2010: as published in The State of Learning Disabilities: Facts, Trends and Emerging Issues, 2014. LD.org)
  • Cost is the most frequent reason why young adults with LD leave postsecondary education.(Tremaine Foundation 2010: as published in The State of Learning Disabilities: Facts, Trends and Emerging Issues, 2014. LD.org)
  • 14.7% of parents of children with LDs said that their child had been diagnosed with emotional, psychological or nervous difficulties, while parents of children without disabilities reported only 1% of such diagnoses. (www.ldao.ca, PACFOLD, LDA of Canada 2007 Report)
  • A significant number of youth and adults with LD had dropped out of the education system altogether, with over one-quarter of Canadians aged 22-29 with LD reporting less than a high school certificate as their highest academic achievement. (www.ldao.ca, PACFOLD, LDA of Canada 2007 Report)
  • Persons with LDs were 2 to 3 times more likely to report fair to poor physical, general, and mental health, and 2 to 3 times less likely to report very good to excellent physical, general and mental health than the general population. (www.ldao.ca, PACFOLD, LDA of Canada 2007 Report)
  • Persons with LDs were more than twice as likely to report high levels of distress, depression, anxiety disorders, sucicidal thoughts, visits to a mental health professional and poorer overall mental health compared to persons without disabilities. (www.ldao.ca, PACFOLD, LDA of Canada 2007 Report)
  • Students with learning disabilities made up 40.8% of students served by the offices for students with disabilities at Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology in Ontario. (Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities (MTCU), 2006-7 report by the COllege Committee on Disability Issues)
  • …Only 56.4% of adults with LDs indicated that all their needs for specialized equipment were met, while 27.7% said that no needs were met. 85.9% paid for their assistive technology themselves. (Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS), 2006)